Wednesday, February 27, 2013

convenant with many?



Obama Visit Code Name: Unbreakable Alliance

Israelis asked to vote for their favorite logo for the visit, on Prime Minister's Facebook page.
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By Gil Ronen
First Publish: 2/17/2013, 6:41 PM

One of suggested logos for visit
One of suggested logos for visit
PMO Facebook page
The English version of the code name chosen for the operations surrounding the upcoming visit to Israel by U.S. President Barack Obama, scheduled for March 20, is "Unbreakable Alliance." The Hebrewname is "Brit Amim," which means, literally, "an alliance between nations."(farmer: =a convenant with the many peoples)
According to Maariv/NRG, the names were chosen carefully by the National Public Information Staff, which is wary of upsetting Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu.
According to this report, Netanyahu was unhappy with the English translation of the name given to Israel's operation in Gaza, "Pillar of Defense." The Hebrew name of that operation was "Pillar of Smoke" – a reference to the pillar of smoke and fire that led the nation of Israel out of Egypt, in the Biblical account of the Exodus.
The meaning of the phrase "Pillar of Defense" was unclear, however.
The English name for Obama's visit is seen as one that imparts the intended meaning and emphasizing the values that Israel wants to stress during the visit.
Visitors to the Prime Minister's Facebook page have been asked to choose between three logos for the visit."
http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/165340#.US5J5qIwrqU

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

eu us dream by j.s.


"MADRID – Today, three European countries are among the world’s seven largest economies. Ten years from now, only two will remain. By 2030, only Germany will still be on the list, and by 2050, none will remain. Indeed, by then, the United States will be the only representative of the West in the top seven.

What this means is that the European states are too small to compete separately in the world of the twenty-first century. It’s as simple as that. By 2030, according to the World Bank, there will be two billion more people, mainly Asians, in the middle class. The pressure on the planet’s resources, commodities, water, and food will be huge, making a global rebalancing practically inevitable. And in a world marked by interdependence and constant change, Europe will find that unity is strength.

Illustration by Dean RohreWhat this means is that the European states are too small to compete separately in the world of the twenty-first century. It’s as simple as that. By 2030, according to the World Bank, there will be two billion more people, mainly Asians, in the middle class. The pressure on the planet’s resources, commodities, water, and food will be huge, making a global rebalancing practically inevitable. And in a world marked by interdependence and constant change, Europe will find that unity is strength.Indeed, unless Europeans work toward integration, they may find themselves surpassed by emerging countries in terms of technological development, job creation, production costs, talent, and creativity.
Indeed, unless Europeans work toward integration, they may find themselves surpassed by emerging countries in terms of technological development, job creation, production costs, talent, and creativity.
 The European Union is still the place where economic and social institutions assure a better quality of life. In this sense, the demand for a European voice in the world is clear – Brazil’s former president, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, spoke of the EU as a “singular international heritage” – because it guarantees the values that represent humanity at its best.
Those values are embodied partly in Europe’s well-developed welfare states, which are an important component of Europeans’ collective identity and a principal point of pride. True, in terms of economic equality, there is only a two-to-one difference in per capita GDP between the richest US state and the poorest (excluding the District of Columbia), while in the EU the ratio is 6.5 to one. But, in terms of conditions within US states and EU countries, things are very different.
The average Gini coefficient (where zero is absolute equality and one is absolute inequality) in Europe is 0.30, compared to 0.45 in the US. China’s coefficient is 0.47. American society is very unequal (and China’s is slightly more so). In Europe, the opposite is true. Its societies are much more egalitarian, while convergence among them is still a long way off (this is, indeed, the great task that Europe faces).
From this perspective, it is not difficult to comprehend Europe’s international appeal. Consider the following thought experiment (a variation on the “veil of ignorance” conjured by the philosopher John Rawls in his effort to design a just society): Taking into account the level and quality of social protection, public education, and health care in the EU and the US, and without knowing beforehand what your social position would be in either society, where would you prefer to be born?
But, if Europe wants to maintain its prosperity-sharing institutions, it must generate economic growth in order to pay for them. That means raising productivity and strengthening competitiveness – and, equally important, asserting Europe’s place in the world.
Europeans have a new reason for hope as they seek to achieve these goals: a transatlantic free-trade agreement. Not long ago, in the 1980’s, Europe was dismissed (by conservative Americans in particular) with the term “eurosclerosis.” The decade following the oil crisis of 1979 was marked by a spike in unemployment, fiscal paralysis, and, indeed, frozen accession negotiations for Spain and Portugal. European economies were stagnating, while the US and Japan were growing.
At the time, Europe’s common market was not yet a single market. Then, a historic convergence of national interests and ideological positions (from François Mitterrand’s Socialists to Margaret Thatcher’s Conservatives to Helmut Kohl’s Christian Democrats) occurred. With great foresight, Europe’s leaders concluded that it was their economies’ lack of integration that was keeping Europe from growing as strongly as the US and Japan.
The solution was to create a much larger market: a single market. This effort culminated in the Single European Act of 1986, which laid the foundation for the virtuous circle of strong growth and lower unemployment in the 1990’s.
Today, the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) is finally on the table, promising to boost growth in the EU and the US alike. In 2012, US exports to the EU totaled roughly €206 billion ($272 billion), while EU exports to the US amounted to nearly €300 billion. Thirty million jobs in Europe (about 10% of the total work force) depend on foreign trade. The quantities are huge, which suggests that the TTIP could have an effect comparable to that of the single market for Europe.
But realizing the TTIP’s potential requires completion of the European integration project. That process is long and slow, but it is the only way to maintain Europe’s relevance as an international actor, with something to say and to offer. Indeed, it has been this process – now in its seventh decade – that has enabled Europeans to enjoy the highest standard of living in the world."

Read more at http://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/transatlantic-free-trade-and-european-integration-by-javier-solana#lM5Pv9tbmcdJG5Kw.99 

Sunday, February 17, 2013

Trade Agreement between the U.S. and EU is possible in less than two years - Javier Solana


Madrid, 16 Feb (AP) - The former head of European diplomacy Javier Solana said today that it will be possible to reach an agreement to create a transatlantic free trade area in less than two years.
Within a session on integrated Europe in the days of the Spanish socialists, former high representative for foreign policy community deemed the announced free trade area between the United States and the European Union (EU) as "an extraordinary idea".
Responding to questions from netizens, Javier Solana said he hoped that bilateral negotiations are rapid and stressed that the free trade area will be the biggest step ever taken in relations between the U.S. and EU.

Link: http://expresso.sapo.pt/acordo-de-comercio-entre-eua-e-ue-e-possivel-em-menos-de-dois-anos-javier-solana=f787647#ixzz2L8soDVsm

Tuesday, February 05, 2013

talks to resume


Iranian Foreign Minister Ali Akbar Salehi, right, hugs former NATO Secretary General Javier Solana as he arrives for the Security Conference in Munich, Germany, on Sunday, Feb. 3, 2013. (photo credit: AP/Matthias Schrader)

http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/world/iran-nuclear-talks-to-resume-20130204-2dthe.html

Feb=2  x ( 03.+(2+0+1)+3)  = 2x  3 3 3 = you name it:666

The EU’s head of foreign policy has arrived in Tehran ahead of what are likely to be intense talks… 06/06/06 07:06 CET


On 9 September 2009( =09/09/09) Iran transmitted a "Package of Proposals for Comprehensive and Constructive Negociations" to the Six. Mr Solana, High Representative ...

stay tuned!
farmer

Friday, February 01, 2013

MSC - munich solana conference

by Johannes Simon (Getty) MUNICH, GERMANY - FEBRUARY 02: Javier Solana (L) and Albanian prime minister Sali Berisha attend a gala dinner for the participants of the Munich conference at Munich royal residence on security policy on February 2, 2013 in Munich, Germany. The Munich Security Conference brings together senior figures from around the world to engage in an intensive debate on current and future security challenges and remains the most important independent forum for the exchange of views by international security policy decision-makers. (Photo by Johannes Simon/Getty Images)

http://www.securityconference.de/fileadmin/user_upload/data/pdf/MSC2013_Participants_2013-02-01_1800.pdf

some parts from the program:

Saturday, 2 February 2013

  9:15 - 11:15 Statements & Discussion
WHAT FUTURE FOR THE EURO-ATLANTIC SECURITY COMMUNITY?
Venue: Conference Hall, Hotel Bayerischer Hof
Joseph R. Biden, Jr.
Vice President, United States of America, Washington, D.C.
Dr. Guido Westerwelle
Federal Minister of Foreign Affairs, Federal Republic of Germany, Berlin
Sergey V. Lavrov
Minister of Foreign Affairs, Russian Federation, Moscow
Baroness Catherine Ashton
Vice President of the European Commission; High Representative for Foreign Affairs and
Security Policy, European Union, Brussels
Anders Fogh Rasmussen
Secretary General, North Atlantic Treaty Organization, Brussels
Moderator: Wolfgang Ischinger
Ambassador, Chairman, Munich Security Conference, Munich
...

17:00 - 18:30 Breakout Session
POOLING & SHARING – BUT WHAT? THE FUTURE OF EUROPEAN DEFENSE
Venue: Kleine Komödie, Hotel Bayerischer Hof
Chairman: Dr. Javier Solana
Former Secretary General of NATO; former Secretary General of the European Council;
former High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy,
Madrid
Jeanine-Antoinette Hennis-Plasschaert
Minister of Defence, Kingdom of the Netherlands, The Hague
Michel Barnier
Commissioner for Internal Market and Services, European Union, Brussels
Bernhard Gerwert
Chief Executive Officer, Cassidian, Unterschleißheim
Jean-Paul Paloméros
General, Supreme Allied Commander Transformation, NATO, Norfolk, VA
Anatoly Antonov
Deputy Minister of Defence, Russian Federation, Moscow
Ashton Carter
Deputy Secretary of Defense, United States of America, Washington, D.C
http://www.securityconference.de/fileadmin/user_upload/data/pdf/Sprecherprogramm_2013-02-01_1440.pdf

stay tuned!
farmer